Fri 21/2/20

Jeremiah 39:1-18 … GOD’S PUNISHMENT OF JERUSALEM AND ZEDEKIAH COMES.

Q.1. Could King Zedekiah and his people escape from judgment? Why? How badly did it go for Zedekiah? – (Jer.39:1-10) =

Q.2. How did the Lord provide for His prophet? – (Jer.39:11-14) =

Q.3. How did God treat Ebed-melech for his protection of Jeremiah the prophet? – (Jer.39:15-18) =

The Fall of Jerusalem

39 In the ninth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem and besieged it. In the eleventh year of Zedekiah, in the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, a breach was made in the city. Then all the officials of the king of Babylon came and sat in the middle gate: Nergal-sar-ezer of Samgar, Nebu-sar-sekim the Rab-saris, Nergal-sar-ezer the Rab-mag, with all the rest of the officers of the king of Babylon. When Zedekiah king of Judah and all the soldiers saw them, they fled, going out of the city at night by way of the king’s garden through the gate between the two walls; and they went toward the Arabah. But the army of the Chaldeans pursued them and overtook Zedekiah in the plains of Jericho. And when they had taken him, they brought him up to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, at Riblah, in the land of Hamath; and he passed sentence on him. The king of Babylon slaughtered the sons of Zedekiah at Riblah before his eyes, and the king of Babylon slaughtered all the nobles of Judah. He put out the eyes of Zedekiah and bound him in chains to take him to Babylon. The Chaldeans burned the king’s house and the house of the people, and broke down the walls of Jerusalem. Then Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, carried into exile to Babylon the rest of the people who were left in the city, those who had deserted to him, and the people who remained. 10 Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, left in the land of Judah some of the poor people who owned nothing, and gave them vineyards and fields at the same time.

The Lord Delivers Jeremiah

11 Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon gave command concerning Jeremiah through Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, saying, 12 “Take him, look after him well, and do him no harm, but deal with him as he tells you.” 13 So Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard, Nebushazban the Rab-saris, Nergal-sar-ezer the Rab-mag, and all the chief officers of the king of Babylon 14 sent and took Jeremiah from the court of the guard. They entrusted him to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, that he should take him home. So he lived among the people.

15 The word of the Lord came to Jeremiah while he was shut up in the court of the guard: 16 “Go, and say to Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will fulfill my words against this city for harm and not for good, and they shall be accomplished before you on that day. 17 But I will deliver you on that day, declares the Lord, and you shall not be given into the hand of the men of whom you are afraid. 18 For I will surely save you, and you shall not fall by the sword, but you shall have your life as a prize of war, because you have put your trust in me, declares the Lord.’”

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. Could King Zedekiah and his people escape from judgment? Why? How badly did it go for Zedekiah? – (Jer.39:1-10) = God knew right from the time of Israel’s birth as a nation, that they would treacherously turn to other gods, and break their covenant with Him. This He had told Moses before Israel ever entered the Promised Land (Deut.31:14-22). Chastisement and judgment would inevitably come. God also knew that Zedekiah would give in to the advice of the rebellious leaders who had persecuted Jeremiah. In the eleventh year of Zedekiah’s reign, Nebuchadnezzar’s army invaded the city of Jerusalem (Jer.39:1-2). Zedekiah and his advisors tried to flee to Egypt for refuge, through the King’s garden, via the Jordan Valley (Jer.39:3-4). They were soon overtaken on the plains of Jericho, and sentence was passed on Zedekiah by Nebuchadnezzar, at Riblah (Jer.39:5-6). Zedekiah’s royal sons were slain before his eyes – He then blinded Zedekiah’s eyes and bound him in fetter of bronze to bring him to Babylon (the last thing he saw) (Jer.39:7). Everything was destroyed. The remaining people were carried into exile, with just a few poor people left to look after the land (Jer.39:8-10). Everything happened, just as Jeremiah had repeatedly warned.

Q.2. How did the Lord provide for His prophet? – (Jer.39:11-14) = Jeremiah was treated with much greater respect by Nebuchadnezzar, King of Babylon than by his own king. Nebuchadnezzar commanded – Take him and look after him, and do nothing harmful to him, but rather deal with him just as he tells you (Jer.39:12). Nebuchadnezzar had no doubt heard of Jeremiah’s prophecies, and his  instructions to the Israeli exiles to settle down and raise families, and to  – seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf; for in its welfare you will have welfare (Jer.29:7. Jeremiah was taken back to his own home, to safety. He was entrusted into the hands of his friend Gedaliah, who was appointed governor over the land. He also was provided with resources to look after his own welfare  (Jer.39:14 c.f. Jer.26:24; 40:5). What an encouraging example of the Lord looking after His own.

Q.3. How did God treat Ebed-melech for his protection of Jeremiah the prophet? – (Jer.39:15-18) = The city of Jerusalem was wrecked, and the people either killed or exiled. However, God did not forget the courage of Ebed-melech, the Ethiopian – 17 But I will deliver you on that day,” declares the Lord, “and you will not be given into the hand of the men whom you dread. 18 For I will certainly rescue you, and you will not fall by the sword; but you will have your own life as booty, because you have trusted in Me,” declares the Lord.’” (Jer.39:17-18). Whether in this life or the one to come, God will come through for His children For after all it is only just for God to repay with affliction those who afflict you, and to give relief to you who are afflicted and to us as well when the Lord Jesus will be revealed from heaven with His mighty angels in flaming fire, dealing out retribution to those who do not know God and to those who do not obey the gospel of our Lord Jesus  (2 Thes.1:6-8).


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Thurs 20/2/20

Psalm 86:1-17 & 87:1-7 … GOD’S GOODNESS TO HIS PEOPLE AND HIS CITY.

Q.1. Why did David expect God to help him in times of trouble? Is this still true today? – (Ps.86:1-10) =

Q.2. What was the heart’s desire of David amid the trials from his enemies? – (Ps.86:11-17) =

Q.3. What made Mount Zion special? – (Ps.87:1-7) =

Great Is Your Steadfast Love

A Prayer of David.

86 Incline your ear, O Lord, and answer me,
    for I am poor and needy.
Preserve my life, for I am godly;
    save your servant, who trusts in you—you are my God.
Be gracious to me, O Lord,
    for to you do I cry all the day.
Gladden the soul of your servant,
    for to you, O Lord, do I lift up my soul.
For you, O Lord, are good and forgiving,
    abounding in steadfast love to all who call upon you.
Give ear, O Lord, to my prayer;
    listen to my plea for grace.
In the day of my trouble I call upon you,
    for you answer me.

There is none like you among the gods, O Lord,
    nor are there any works like yours.
All the nations you have made shall come
    and worship before you, O Lord,
    and shall glorify your name.
10 For you are great and do wondrous things;
    you alone are God.
11 Teach me your way, O Lord,
    that I may walk in your truth;
    unite my heart to fear your name.
12 I give thanks to you, O Lord my God, with my whole heart,
    and I will glorify your name forever.
13 For great is your steadfast love toward me;
    you have delivered my soul from the depths of Sheol.

14 O God, insolent men have risen up against me;
    a band of ruthless men seeks my life,
    and they do not set you before them.
15 But you, O Lord, are a God merciful and gracious,
    slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness.
16 Turn to me and be gracious to me;
    give your strength to your servant,
    and save the son of your maidservant.
17 Show me a sign of your favor,
    that those who hate me may see and be put to shame
    because you, Lord, have helped me and comforted me.

Glorious Things of You Are Spoken

A Psalm of the Sons of Korah. A Song.

87 On the holy mount stands the city he founded;
    the Lord loves the gates of Zion
    more than all the dwelling places of Jacob.
Glorious things of you are spoken,
    O city of God. Selah

Among those who know me I mention Rahab and Babylon;
    behold, Philistia and Tyre, with Cush[a]
    “This one was born there,” they say.
And of Zion it shall be said,
    “This one and that one were born in her”;
    for the Most High himself will establish her.
The Lord records as he registers the peoples,
    “This one was born there.” Selah

Singers and dancers alike say,
    “All my springs are in you.”

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. Why did David expect God to help him in times of trouble? Is this still true today? – (Ps.86:1-10) = David knew that God was in the business of answering prayer, and that He would show compassion toward the needy who trust in Him. Mostly, David relied on this sure knowledge – FOR YOU, LORD, ARE GOOD, AND READY TO FORGIVE SIN, AND ABUNDANT IN LOVING-KINDNESS TO ALL WHO CALL UPON YOU (Ps.86:5). Even though he claimed to be godly, David staked his claims for God’s intervention on God’s character, which is unswervingly good, and compassionate toward sinners – For You are great and do wondrous deeds; You alone are God (Ps.86:10). That fact is not true for any other. God is the only One on Whom we can truly count.   In fact, David understood that God’s concern extended to all people everywhere – All nations whom You have made shall come and worship before You, O Lord, and they shall glorify Your name (Ps.86:9). God loves the whole world (Jn.3:16). He is much more wonderful than most people realize – For You are great and do wondrous deeds; You alone are God (Ps.86:10).

Q.2. What was the heart’s desire of David amid the trials from his enemies? – (Ps.86:11-17) = David had a heart for God and his theme-song was – Teach me Your way, O Lord; I will walk in Your truth; Unite my heart to fear Your name (Ps.86:11). This was a cumulative response to God’s goodness to him, which had become even clearer during times of trouble (Ps.86:12-13). The contrast between the contention of his enemies and the mercy of the Lord, only served to accentuate God’s love and grace (Ps.86:14-15). David  sought for a sign of God’s presence, so his assailants would be put to shame for their insults against God and His anointed one (Ps.86:17). God will always ultimately make a distinction between the righteous and the wicked (Mal.3:18).

Q.3. What made Mount Zion special? – (Ps.87:1-7) = This psalm acknowledges God’s love for Jerusalem, located on Mount Zion in the hill country of Judea – The Lord loves the gates of Zion more than all the other dwelling places of Jacob (Ps.87:2). It was special, because God promised to meet there with His people – There I will meet with you; and from the mercy seat from between the two cherubim which are upon the ark of the testimony, I will speak to you about all that I will give you in commandment for the sons of Israel (Exo.25:22). The psalmist declared – Glorious thnigs are spoken of you, O city of God (Ps.87:3, 5). It was the place God has chosen as the religious centre of the world in the Messianic Kingdom (Isa.4:2-4; 56:6-8; Mic.4:1-4) – For the Lord has chosen Zion; He has desired it for His holy habitation. This is My resting place forever; Here I will dwell, for I have desired it (Psa.132:13-14). The temple, providing atonement and rich worship, was a regular source of refreshment, where Israel’s relationship with the Lord could be strengthened (c.f.1 Chron.6:31-32, 25:ll1-8). Every place set up for the worship of God, from a cathedral to a hut, can be special and should be valued, because it can foster a real relationship with God (Heb.10:23-25).


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@cityreach.com.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Wed 19/2/20

1 Kings 1:35-53 & 2:1-12 … DAVID CHARGE TO SOLOMON AFTER HIS ANOINTING AS KING.

Q.1. What impact did the anointing of Solomon have on David and his son Adonijah? How did Solomon treat his brother? – (1 Kgs.1:1:35-53) =

Q .2. What wise advice did David give to the young Solomon? Can these promises still be claimed and apply today? – (1 Kgs.2:1-4) =

Q.3. Why would David ask Solomon to exact righteous judgment on some notable men? – (1 Kgs.2:5-12) =

35 You shall then come up after him, and he shall come and sit on my throne, for he shall be king in my place. And I have appointed him to be ruler over Israel and over Judah.” 36 And Benaiah the son of Jehoiada answered the king, “Amen! May the Lord, the God of my lord the king, say so. 37 As the Lord has been with my lord the king, even so may he be with Solomon, and make his throne greater than the throne of my lord King David.”

38 So Zadok the priest, Nathan the prophet, and Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, and the Cherethites and the Pelethites went down and had Solomon ride on King David’s mule and brought him to Gihon. 39 There Zadok the priest took the horn of oil from the tent and anointed Solomon. Then they blew the trumpet, and all the people said, “Long live King Solomon!” 40 And all the people went up after him, playing on pipes, and rejoicing with great joy, so that the earth was split by their noise.

41 Adonijah and all the guests who were with him heard it as they finished feasting. And when Joab heard the sound of the trumpet, he said, “What does this uproar in the city mean?” 42 While he was still speaking, behold, Jonathan the son of Abiathar the priest came. And Adonijah said, “Come in, for you are a worthy man and bring good news.” 43 Jonathan answered Adonijah, “No, for our lord King David has made Solomon king, 44 and the king has sent with him Zadok the priest, Nathan the prophet, and Benaiah the son of Jehoiada, and the Cherethites and the Pelethites. And they had him ride on the king’s mule. 45 And Zadok the priest and Nathan the prophet have anointed him king at Gihon, and they have gone up from there rejoicing, so that the city is in an uproar. This is the noise that you have heard. 46 Solomon sits on the royal throne. 47 Moreover, the king’s servants came to congratulate our lord King David, saying, ‘May your God make the name of Solomon more famous than yours, and make his throne greater than your throne.’ And the king bowed himself on the bed. 48 And the king also said, ‘Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, who has granted someone[a] to sit on my throne this day, my own eyes seeing it.’”

49 Then all the guests of Adonijah trembled and rose, and each went his own way. 50 And Adonijah feared Solomon. So he arose and went and took hold of the horns of the altar. 51 Then it was told Solomon, “Behold, Adonijah fears King Solomon, for behold, he has laid hold of the horns of the altar, saying, ‘Let King Solomon swear to me first that he will not put his servant to death with the sword.’” 52 And Solomon said, “If he will show himself a worthy man, not one of his hairs shall fall to the earth, but if wickedness is found in him, he shall die.” 53 So King Solomon sent, and they brought him down from the altar. And he came and paid homage to King Solomon, and Solomon said to him, “Go to your house.”

David’s Instructions to Solomon

When David’s time to die drew near, he commanded Solomon his son, saying, “I am about to go the way of all the earth. Be strong, and show yourself a man, and keep the charge of the Lord your God, walking in his ways and keeping his statutes, his commandments, his rules, and his testimonies, as it is written in the Law of Moses, that you may prosper in all that you do and wherever you turn, that the Lord may establish his word that he spoke concerning me, saying, ‘If your sons pay close attention to their way, to walk before me in faithfulness with all their heart and with all their soul, you shall not lack[b] a man on the throne of Israel.’

“Moreover, you also know what Joab the son of Zeruiah did to me, how he dealt with the two commanders of the armies of Israel, Abner the son of Ner, and Amasa the son of Jether, whom he killed, avenging[c] in time of peace for blood that had been shed in war, and putting the blood of war[d] on the belt around his[e] waist and on the sandals on his feet. Act therefore according to your wisdom, but do not let his gray head go down to Sheol in peace. But deal loyally with the sons of Barzillai the Gileadite, and let them be among those who eat at your table, for with such loyalty[f] they met me when I fled from Absalom your brother. And there is also with you Shimei the son of Gera, the Benjaminite from Bahurim, who cursed me with a grievous curse on the day when I went to Mahanaim. But when he came down to meet me at the Jordan, I swore to him by the Lord, saying, ‘I will not put you to death with the sword.’ Now therefore do not hold him guiltless, for you are a wise man. You will know what you ought to do to him, and you shall bring his gray head down with blood to Sheol.”

The Death of David

10 Then David slept with his fathers and was buried in the city of David. 11 And the time that David reigned over Israel was forty years. He reigned seven years in Hebron and thirty-three years in Jerusalem. 12 So Solomon sat on the throne of David his father, and his kingdom was firmly established.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. What impact did the anointing of Solomon have on David and his son Adonijah? How did Solomon treat his brother? – (1 Kgs.1:35-53) = Solomon was anointed  king over Israel and Judah, and placed on King David’s mule. This event was accompanied by the fanfare of trumpets – All the people went up after him, and the people were playing on flutes and rejoicing with great joy, so that the earth shook at their noise (1 Kgs.1:40 c.f. 1 Kgs.1:33-34). Soon Adonijah and his guests were told – 43 … Our lord King David has made Solomon king … 46 Besides, Solomon has even taken his seat on the throne of the kingdom. 47 Moreover, the king’s servants came to bless our lord King David, saying, ‘May your God make the name of Solomon better than your name and his throne greater than your throne!’ And the king bowed himself on the bed. 48 The king has also said thus, ‘Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, who has granted one to sit on my throne today while my own eyes see it’ (1 Kgs.1:43, 46-48). The ‘friends’ of Adonijah abandoned him (1 Kgs.1:49). Adonijah fled from Solomon and took hold of the horns of the altar for protection (1 Kgs.1:50). Solomon then placed him under house arrest and promised him immunity, as long as he avoided causing offence to the kingdom. This was an appropriate way to treat the entitled Adonijah (1 Kgs.1:51-53). David, by contrast, was full of joy – Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, who has granted one to sit on my throne today while my own eyes see it (1Kgs.1:48).

Q .2. What wise advice did David give to the young Solomon? Can these promises still be claimed and apply today? – (1 Kgs.2:1-4) = The aged David knew what had been the source of his blessing. He sought to impart this to his son, by urging him – Keep the charge of the Lord your God, to walk in His ways, to keep His statutes, His commandments, His ordinances, and His testimonies, according to what is written in the Law of Moses, that you may succeed in all that you do and wherever you turn (1 Kgs.2:3). To walk in the ways of the Lord, is still the basis for success in our daily living. God had also promised David that his dynasty would not fail, as long as – ‘If your sons are careful of their way, to walk before Me in truth with all their heart and with all their soul, you shall not lack a man on the throne of Israel.’ (1 Kgs.2:4). This promise specifically applied to David.

Q.3. Why would David ask Solomon to exact righteous judgment on some notable men? – (1 Kgs.2:5-12) = David had shown wonderful leadership qualities throughout his reign. He was well aware of his own faults, and did not use his power to execute personal vengeance. He could have reacted to the bloodthirstiness of his commander Joab. His restraint when cursed by Shimei from the tribe of Benjamin, was outstanding. He realized the foolishness of trying to build a united kingdom by misusing his power as the king. However, these men had committed crimes of murder and treason, for which they deserved to die (1 Kgs.2:5 & 8).  David warned Solomon that these men meant trouble for  the unity of the nation. Equally, David reminded Solomon about the kindness of Barzillai from Gilead (1 Kgs.2:7). All these men deserved to be appropriately rewarded in due time. David released his son to rule as he saw fit and without prejudice (1 Kgs.2:6 & 9). David lived out his three score years and ten, and was buried in royal David’s city (1 Kgs.2:10-11 c.f. 2 Sam.5:4; Lk.2:11). Solomon’s – kingdom was firmly established (1 Kgs.2:12).


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Tues 18/2/20

Leviticus 9:1-24 … GOD RATIFIES THE ROLE OF THE PRIESTHOOD.

Q.1. In what way were the activities following the ordination of the priests to be special? – (Lev.9:1-7) =

Q.2. Why were sin & burnt & peace offerings needed for Aaron, the elders, and the people? – (Lev.9:8-21) =

Q.3. How did God ratify His acceptance of the role of the priests and their sacrifices for His people? – (Lev.9:22-24) =

The Lord Accepts Aaron’s Offering

On the eighth day Moses called Aaron and his sons and the elders of Israel, and he said to Aaron, “Take for yourself a bull calf for a sin offering and a ram for a burnt offering, both without blemish, and offer them before the Lord. And say to the people of Israel, ‘Take a male goat for a sin offering, and a calf and a lamb, both a year old without blemish, for a burnt offering, and an ox and a ram for peace offerings, to sacrifice before the Lord, and a grain offering mixed with oil, for today the Lord will appear to you.’” And they brought what Moses commanded in front of the tent of meeting, and all the congregation drew near and stood before the Lord. And Moses said, “This is the thing that the Lord commanded you to do, that the glory of the Lord may appear to you.” Then Moses said to Aaron, “Draw near to the altar and offer your sin offering and your burnt offering and make atonement for yourself and for the people, and bring the offering of the people and make atonement for them, as the Lord has commanded.”

So Aaron drew near to the altar and killed the calf of the sin offering, which was for himself. And the sons of Aaron presented the blood to him, and he dipped his finger in the blood and put it on the horns of the altar and poured out the blood at the base of the altar. 10 But the fat and the kidneys and the long lobe of the liver from the sin offering he burned on the altar, as the Lord commanded Moses. 11 The flesh and the skin he burned up with fire outside the camp.

12 Then he killed the burnt offering, and Aaron’s sons handed him the blood, and he threw it against the sides of the altar. 13 And they handed the burnt offering to him, piece by piece, and the head, and he burned them on the altar. 14 And he washed the entrails and the legs and burned them with the burnt offering on the altar.

15 Then he presented the people’s offering and took the goat of the sin offering that was for the people and killed it and offered it as a sin offering, like the first one. 16 And he presented the burnt offering and offered it according to the rule. 17 And he presented the grain offering, took a handful of it, and burned it on the altar, besides the burnt offering of the morning.

18 Then he killed the ox and the ram, the sacrifice of peace offerings for the people. And Aaron’s sons handed him the blood, and he threw it against the sides of the altar. 19 But the fat pieces of the ox and of the ram, the fat tail and that which covers the entrails and the kidneys and the long lobe of the liver— 20 they put the fat pieces on the breasts, and he burned the fat pieces on the altar, 21 but the breasts and the right thigh Aaron waved for a wave offering before the Lord, as Moses commanded.

22 Then Aaron lifted up his hands toward the people and blessed them, and he came down from offering the sin offering and the burnt offering and the peace offerings. 23 And Moses and Aaron went into the tent of meeting, and when they came out they blessed the people, and the glory of the Lord appeared to all the people. 24 And fire came out from before the Lord and consumed the burnt offering and the pieces of fat on the altar, and when all the people saw it, they shouted and fell on their faces.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. In what way were the activities following the ordination of the priests to be special? – (Lev.9:1-7) = The ordination of the priesthood was to be a significant day. Therefore, Moses called Aaron and his sons, along with the elders of the people. He also gathered all the sons of Israel to witness the event (Lev.9:1 & 3 c.f. Lev.8:3-5). Moses told the priesthood – This is the thing which the Lord has commanded you to do, that the glory of the Lord may appear to you (Lev.9:6). First they were to – Come near to the altar and offer your sin offering and your burnt offering, that you may make atonement for yourself and for the people; then make the offering for the people, that you may make atonement for them, just as the Lord has commanded (Lev.9:7). The setting aside of the priesthood was so significant, the day would be hallowed by God – for today the Lord will appear to you (Lev.9:4).

Q.2. Why were sin & burnt & peace offerings needed for Aaron, the elders, and the people? – (Lev.9:8-21) = The whole priesthood, including Aaron and his sons, needed to make appropriate sacrifices for their own sins (Lev.9:8-14 c.f. Heb.5:1-3). This then had to be repeated on behalf of all the people (Lev.9:15-21). This was to confirm the fact that everyone – the priests, the leaders, and all other people, were guilty before a holy God, and needed an offering to cover their sins. No one was exempted. Without a blood covering, the appearance of God’s glory would have had fatal consequences.  Today, the Gospel needs to be embraced by all, including the leaders, preachers, pastors, and all other people.

Q.3. How did God ratify His acceptance of the role of the priests, and their sacrifices for His people? – (Lev.9:22-24) = This inaugural offering for the sins of all Israel was ratified when – fire came out from before the Lord and consumed the burnt offering and the portions of fat on the altar – (Lev.9:24). At the commencement of the priestly role – the glory of the Lord appeared to all the people … and when the people saw it, they shouted and fell on their faces (Lev.9:23-24). This direct intervention by God would no longer continue, since it was documented in the Scripture that God approved of the sacrificial system He had established. This would bring atonement between God and sinners – Come near to the altar and offer your sin offering and your burnt offering, that you may make atonement for yourself and for the people; then make the offering for the people, that you may make atonement for them, just as the Lord has commanded (Lev.9:7). There would be occasions when other such dramatic manifestations would come, as happened to Gideon, and also at the contest between Elijah and the prophets of Baal (Jdgs.6:21; 1 Kgs.18:38).  This event here, was no more the norm than were the manifestations accompanying the giving of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost (Acts 2:1-4).


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Mon 17/2/20

Luke 3:21-38 … THE BAPTISM OF JESUS AND HIS GENEALOGY.

Q.1. How was Jesus recognized as the Son of God? Why would the Father express His approval of His Son? – (Lk.3:21-22) =

Q.2. Whose Son was Jesus? – (Lk.3:22-23) =

Q.3. Whose genealogy does Luke give? Does it matter? – (Lk.3:23) =

21 Now when all the people were baptized, and when Jesus also had been baptized and was praying, the heavens were opened, 22 and the Holy Spirit descended on him in bodily form, like a dove; and a voice came from heaven, “You are my beloved Son;[a] with you I am well pleased.”[b]

The Genealogy of Jesus Christ

23 Jesus, when he began his ministry, was about thirty years of age, being the son (as was supposed) of Joseph, the son of Heli, 24 the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, the son of Melchi, the son of Jannai, the son of Joseph, 25 the son of Mattathias, the son of Amos, the son of Nahum, the son of Esli, the son of Naggai, 26 the son of Maath, the son of Mattathias, the son of Semein, the son of Josech, the son of Joda, 27 the son of Joanan, the son of Rhesa, the son of Zerubbabel, the son of Shealtiel,[c] the son of Neri, 28 the son of Melchi, the son of Addi, the son of Cosam, the son of Elmadam, the son of Er, 29 the son of Joshua, the son of Eliezer, the son of Jorim, the son of Matthat, the son of Levi, 30 the son of Simeon, the son of Judah, the son of Joseph, the son of Jonam, the son of Eliakim, 31 the son of Melea, the son of Menna, the son of Mattatha, the son of Nathan, the son of David, 32 the son of Jesse, the son of Obed, the son of Boaz, the son of Sala, the son of Nahshon, 33 the son of Amminadab, the son of Admin, the son of Arni, the son of Hezron, the son of Perez, the son of Judah, 34 the son of Jacob, the son of Isaac, the son of Abraham, the son of Terah, the son of Nahor, 35 the son of Serug, the son of Reu, the son of Peleg, the son of Eber, the son of Shelah, 36 the son of Cainan, the son of Arphaxad, the son of Shem, the son of Noah, the son of Lamech, 37 the son of Methuselah, the son of Enoch, the son of Jared, the son of Mahalaleel, the son of Cainan, 38 the son of Enos, the son of Seth, the son of Adam, the son of God.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. How was Jesus recognized as the Son of God? Why would the Father express His approval of His Son? – (Lk.3:21-22) = There were several miraculous events accompanying the baptism of Jesus, according to the writer Luke – 22 (1) … Jesus was also baptized, and while He was praying, heaven was opened, and the Holy Spirit descended upon Him in bodily form like a dove (Lk.3:21-22). (2) … a voice came out of heaven, “You are My beloved Son, in You I am well-pleased.” (Lk.3:22). According to the testimony of John the Baptist – 31 I did not recognize Him, but so that He might be manifested to Israel, I came baptizing in water.” 32 John testified saying, “I have seen the Spirit descending as a dove out of heaven, and He remained upon Him. 33 I did not recognize Him, but He who sent me to baptize in water said to me, ‘He upon whom you see the Spirit descending and remaining upon Him, this is the One who baptizes in the Holy Spirit.’ 34 I myself have seen, and have testified that this is the Son of God.” (Jn.1:31-34). Mostly, it was the direct words of the Father in heaven that bestowed Sonship on Jesus. However, up to this time, the life of Jesus had been private. He did not begin His formal ministry until after His baptism and temptation. Why, then, did the Father express His pleasure in Jesus at this time? Since His birth, Jesus had lived a perfect life … and He always would (Heb.5:7-9). His submission to baptism indicated that Jesus was identifying with sinners, and was taking up His mission as the Lamb of God Who would take away the sins of the world (Jn.1:29). This brought great delight to the heart of God (c.f. Jn.10:17).

Q.2. Whose Son was Jesus? – (Lk.3:22-23) = We have already established that Jesus was the Son of God. Mary, mother of Jesus, was a virgin and asked how it was possible that she would give birth to a son. The archangel Gabriel informed her – The Holy Spirit will come upon you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you; and for that reason the holy Child shall be called the Son of God (Lk.1:34-35). Joseph did not father the Child, but adopted Him by marrying Mary after she became pregnant (Mt.1:25). Adoption was very significant in those days, when the life expectancy was low. Families often took on the children of people who had died.. Adoption is highly significant for the child of God because that is how we enter into God’s family (Rom.8:15-16; Eph.1:5). Luke simply explained the relationship this way – Jesus was about thirty years of age, being as was supposed, the son of Joseph (Lk.3:23). God commanded Moses to number all males from twenty years and above. The priests were not to be numbered before they were thirty (c.f. Num.1:1-3 c.f. Num.4:1-3). Jesus was now at the mature age that a High Priest needed to be (Heb.5:5-6; 7:11-22).

Q.3. Whose genealogy does Luke give? Does it matter? – (Lk.3:23) = Luke’s genealogy moves backward from Jesus to Adam, whereas Matthew’s genealogy moves forward from Abraham to Joseph. The MacArthur Bible Commentary gives an excellent explanation of the discrepancies between the two genealogies. Luke’s genealogy gives Mary’s bloodline whereas Matthew’s genealogy gives Joseph’s royal descent, that was passed onto Jesus through the legal father (Mt.1:1-17; Lk.3:23-38). This mattered, because the Messiah was prophesied to come through the lineage of King David. It also underscores God’s acceptance of the judicial basis of the believer’s adoption into God’s family … and the substitution of Christ’s death in the place of sinners.


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009