Fri 9/11/18

Isaiah 43:1-28 … GOD FORETELLS THE DEMISE OF BABYLON BUT REGATHERING AND CLEANSING OF ISRAEL.

Q.1. What is Israel’s relationship with the Lord? How extensive are His promises to His people? Why is Israel to be treated like this? Has any part of this promise been fulfilled? – (Isa.43:1-7) =

Q.2. How can God make these promises? How does that make Him unique? For what reason has God called Israel? What does fulfilled prophecy highlight about God? – (Isa.43:8-13) =

Q.3. What will happen to Babylon? What unique thing will God do for the land and His people? What was Israel’s worship like? Does God respond as you would expect? – (Isa.43:14-28)

Israel’s Only Savior

43 But now thus says the Lord,
he who created you, O Jacob,
    he who formed you, O Israel:
“Fear not, for I have redeemed you;
    I have called you by name, you are mine.
When you pass through the waters, I will be with you;
    and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you;
when you walk through fire you shall not be burned,
    and the flame shall not consume you.
For I am the Lord your God,
    the Holy One of Israel, your Savior.
I give Egypt as your ransom,
    Cush and Seba in exchange for you.
Because you are precious in my eyes,
    and honored, and I love you,
I give men in return for you,
    peoples in exchange for your life.
Fear not, for I am with you;
    I will bring your offspring from the east,
    and from the west I will gather you.
I will say to the north, Give up,
    and to the south, Do not withhold;
bring my sons from afar
    and my daughters from the end of the earth,
everyone who is called by my name,
    whom I created for my glory,
    whom I formed and made.”

Bring out the people who are blind, yet have eyes,
    who are deaf, yet have ears!
All the nations gather together,
    and the peoples assemble.
Who among them can declare this,
    and show us the former things?
Let them bring their witnesses to prove them right,
    and let them hear and say, It is true.
10 “You are my witnesses,” declares the Lord,
    “and my servant whom I have chosen,
that you may know and believe me
    and understand that I am he.
Before me no god was formed,
    nor shall there be any after me.
11 I, I am the Lord,
    and besides me there is no savior.
12 I declared and saved and proclaimed,
    when there was no strange god among you;
    and you are my witnesses,” declares the Lord, “and I am God.
13 Also henceforth I am he;
    there is none who can deliver from my hand;
    I work, and who can turn it back?”

14 Thus says the Lord,
    your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel:
“For your sake I send to Babylon
    and bring them all down as fugitives,
    even the Chaldeans, in the ships in which they rejoice.
15 I am the Lord, your Holy One,
    the Creator of Israel, your King.”

16 Thus says the Lord,
    who makes a way in the sea,
    a path in the mighty waters,
17 who brings forth chariot and horse,
    army and warrior;
they lie down, they cannot rise,
    they are extinguished, quenched like a wick:
18 “Remember not the former things,
    nor consider the things of old.
19 Behold, I am doing a new thing;
    now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?
I will make a way in the wilderness
    and rivers in the desert.
20 The wild beasts will honor me,
    the jackals and the ostriches,
for I give water in the wilderness,
    rivers in the desert,
to give drink to my chosen people,
21     the people whom I formed for myself
that they might declare my praise.

22 “Yet you did not call upon me, O Jacob;
    but you have been weary of me, O Israel!
23 You have not brought me your sheep for burnt offerings,
    or honored me with your sacrifices.
I have not burdened you with offerings,
    or wearied you with frankincense.
24 You have not bought me sweet cane with money,
    or satisfied me with the fat of your sacrifices.
But you have burdened me with your sins;
    you have wearied me with your iniquities.

25 “I, I am he
    who blots out your transgressions for my own sake,
    and I will not remember your sins.
26 Put me in remembrance; let us argue together;
    set forth your case, that you may be proved right.
27 Your first father sinned,
    and your mediators transgressed against me.
28 Therefore I will profane the princes of the sanctuary,
    and deliver Jacob to utter destruction
    and Israel to reviling.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. What is Israel’s relationship with the Lord? How extensive are His promises to His people? Why is Israel to be treated like this? Has any part of this promise been fulfilled? – (Isa.43:1-7) = God reminds His people that He formed them. He redeemed them and therefore they belong to Him – I have called you by name; so You are Mine (Isa.43:1). Because of their sins He has chastened them but because they belong to Him – When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; And through the rivers, they will not overflow you. When you walk through the fire, you will not be scorched, nor will the flame burn you (Isa.43:2). As His people – you are precious in My sight, Since you are honoured and I love you, I will give other men in your place and other peoples in exchange for your life (Isa.43:4). This He does – For I am the Lord your God, the Holy One of Israel, your Saviour (Isa.43:3). Unlike those nations that do not regard Him, Israel will be treated as His special possession. Because of Israel’s sin, they will be removed from the land but – 5 Do not fear, for I am with you; I will bring your offspring from the east, and gather you from the west. 6 I will say to the north, `Give them up!’ And to the south, `Do not hold them back.’ Bring My sons from afar and My daughters from the ends of the earth (Isa.43:5-6). This has been happening ever since Israel was constituted as a nation in May, 1948. This is one of the reasons God chose Israel – Everyone who is called by My name, and whom I have created for My glory, whom I have formed, even whom I have made (Isa.43:7). This calling to be His witnesses to the nations is irrevocable – “You are My witnesses,” declares the Lord, “And My servant whom I have chosen, so that you may know and believe Me and understand that I am He. Before Me there was no God formed, and there will be none after Me (Isa.43:10 c.f. Rom.11:29).

Q.2. How can God make these promises? How does that make Him unique? For what reason has God called Israel? What does fulfilled prophecy highlight about God? – (Isa.43:8-13) = Compared with God’s sovereign control all of us are flawed and have no power over the future. God asks – … Who among them can declare this and proclaim to us the former things? Let them present their witnesses that they may be justified, or let them hear and say, “It is true.” (Isa.43:9). What He is doing and will do to Israel is proof of God’s wisdom and sovereign control – 11 “I, even I, am the Lord, and there is no Saviour besides Me. 12 “It is I who have declared and saved and proclaimed … So you are My witnesses,” declares the Lord, “and I am God. 13 “Even from eternity I am He, and there is none who can deliver out of My hand; I act and who can reverse it?” (Isa.43:11-13). Israel’s restoration from dispersion is living proof that God can and does tell the end from the beginning!

Q.3. What will happen to Babylon? What unique thing will God do for the land and His people? What was Israel’s worship like? Does God respond as you would expect? – (Isa.43:14-28) = God reminds His people of His sovereign authority – I am the Lord, your Holy One, the Creator of Israel, your King (Isa.43:15). Babylon, Judah’s destroyer will be destroyed – … They will lie down together and not rise again; They have been quenched and extinguished like a wick (Isa.43:17). Something utterly inconceivable will happen – I will do something new, now it will spring forth; Will you not be aware of it? I will even make a roadway in the wilderness, rivers in the desert (Isa.43:19). It is unexpected because the land is going to be destroyed and the nation scattered because of its sin. Judah’s worship is insincere and a formality and – You have not brought to Me the sheep of your burnt offerings, nor have you honoured Me with your sacrifices … (Isa.43:23 c.f. Isa.43:22-24). All others would reject such a unfaithfulness but God makes His appeal – Put Me in remembrance, let us argue our case together … (Isa.43:26). God proves He is in a league of His own as He declares to the nation – I, even I, am the one who wipes out your transgressions for My own sake, and I will not remember your sins (Isa.43:25). Without such a heart of love for rebel sinners, we would have no hope. But history shows that in the fullness of time, God sent His Son to be our Saviour!


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

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Thurs 8/11/18

Proverbs 6:12-19 … SOLOMON WARNS HIS SON TO AVOID WICKED AND WORTHLESS PEOPLE.

Q.1. What are the characteristics of a wicked and worthless person? How are we to understand these descriptions? What will happen to such a wicked person? – (Prov.6:12-15) =

Q.2. What attitudes of the heart does God despise? How are we to understand Solomon’s wisdom in these matters? How is he trying to protect his children? – (Prov.6:16-19) =

A worthless person, a wicked man,
    goes about with crooked speech,
13 winks with his eyes, signals[a] with his feet,
    points with his finger,
14 with perverted heart devises evil,
    continually sowing discord;
15 therefore calamity will come upon him suddenly;
    in a moment he will be broken beyond healing.

16 There are six things that the Lord hates,
    seven that are an abomination to him:
17 haughty eyes, a lying tongue,
    and hands that shed innocent blood,
18 a heart that devises wicked plans,
    feet that make haste to run to evil,
19 a false witness who breathes out lies,
    and one who sows discord among brothers.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. What are the characteristics of a wicked and worthless person? How are we to understand these descriptions? What will happen to such a wicked person? – (Prov.6:12-15) = Solomon describes a wicked and worthless person as one who speaks double-talk with ‘a forked tongue’;  one who winks with his eyes and uses signals to deceive. The wicked are not straight-forward or true to their words; they plan evil, and spread private information that causes strife. But Solomon had seen it all and declares about wicked men that – his calamity will come suddenly; Instantly he will be broken and there will be no remedy (Prov.6:15).

Q.2. What attitudes of the heart does God despise? How are we to understand Solomon’s wisdom in these matters? How is he trying to protect his children? – (Prov.6:16-19) = We should take note of what the Lord hates and avoid it like a plague – 17 Haughty eyes, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, 18 A heart that devises wicked plans, feet that run rapidly to evil, 19 A false witness who utters lies, and one who spreads strife among brothers (Prov.6:17-19). He hates pride, lies, ruthlessness, evil plans, false witnesses, and those that spread strife among brothers. He desires for His children to be true to others in their thought life, their conversations, and their actions.


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version (ESV), copyright 2001 by Crossway. Used by permission. All rights reserved)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Wed 7/11/18

Judges 20:1-48 … THE COSTLY CIVIL WAR TO DEFEAT EVIL IN THE NATION.

Q.1. What made the response of the tribes unusual? How did the Levite explain the need for retribution? How did the tribes respond? What strategy did they employ? – (Jdgs.20:1-11) =

Q.2. How did the tribe of Benjamin respond to the request from Israel’s army? What was the outcome from the battle? How did Israel respond to the defeat? – (Jdgs.20:12-23) =

Q.3. How did the second battle end? What makes this surprising? What promise did God make through Phinehas? What made Benjamin complacent? – (Jdgs.20:24-35) =

Q.4. What battle plan did Israel put into place? How was Benjamin defeated? Was the triumph immediate? What was God teaching His people? Is the defeat of evil always costly? –(Jdgs.20:36-48) =

Israel’s War with the Tribe of Benjamin

20 Then all the people of Israel came out, from Dan to Beersheba, including the land of Gilead, and the congregation assembled as one man to the Lord at Mizpah. And the chiefs of all the people, of all the tribes of Israel, presented themselves in the assembly of the people of God, 400,000 men on foot that drew the sword. (Now the people of Benjamin heard that the people of Israel had gone up to Mizpah.) And the people of Israel said, “Tell us, how did this evil happen?” And the Levite, the husband of the woman who was murdered, answered and said, “I came to Gibeah that belongs to Benjamin, I and my concubine, to spend the night. And the leaders of Gibeah rose against me and surrounded the house against me by night. They meant to kill me, and they violated my concubine, and she is dead. So I took hold of my concubine and cut her in pieces and sent her throughout all the country of the inheritance of Israel, for they have committed abomination and outrage in Israel. Behold, you people of Israel, all of you, give your advice and counsel here.”

And all the people arose as one man, saying, “None of us will go to his tent, and none of us will return to his house. But now this is what we will do to Gibeah: we will go up against it by lot, 10 and we will take ten men of a hundred throughout all the tribes of Israel, and a hundred of a thousand, and a thousand of ten thousand, to bring provisions for the people, that when they come they may repay Gibeah of Benjamin for all the outrage that they have committed in Israel.” 11 So all the men of Israel gathered against the city, united as one man.

12 And the tribes of Israel sent men through all the tribe of Benjamin, saying, “What evil is this that has taken place among you? 13 Now therefore give up the men, the worthless fellows in Gibeah, that we may put them to death and purge evil from Israel.” But the Benjaminites would not listen to the voice of their brothers, the people of Israel.14 Then the people of Benjamin came together out of the cities to Gibeah to go out to battle against the people of Israel. 15 And the people of Benjamin mustered out of their cities on that day 26,000 men who drew the sword, besides the inhabitants of Gibeah, who mustered 700 chosen men. 16 Among all these were 700 chosen men who were left-handed; every one could sling a stone at a hair and not miss. 17 And the men of Israel, apart from Benjamin, mustered 400,000 men who drew the sword; all these were men of war.

18 The people of Israel arose and went up to Bethel and inquired of God, “Who shall go up first for us to fight against the people of Benjamin?” And the Lord said, “Judah shall go up first.”

19 Then the people of Israel rose in the morning and encamped against Gibeah. 20 And the men of Israel went out to fight against Benjamin, and the men of Israel drew up the battle line against them at Gibeah. 21 The people of Benjamin came out of Gibeah and destroyed on that day 22,000 men of the Israelites. 22 But the people, the men of Israel, took courage, and again formed the battle line in the same place where they had formed it on the first day. 23 And the people of Israel went up and wept before the Lord until the evening. And they inquired of the Lord, “Shall we again draw near to fight against our brothers, the people of Benjamin?” And the Lord said, “Go up against them.”

24 So the people of Israel came near against the people of Benjamin the second day. 25 And Benjamin went against them out of Gibeah the second day, and destroyed 18,000 men of the people of Israel. All these were men who drew the sword. 26 Then all the people of Israel, the whole army, went up and came to Bethel and wept. They sat there before the Lord and fasted that day until evening, and offered burnt offerings and peace offerings before the Lord. 27 And the people of Israel inquired of the Lord (for the ark of the covenant of God was there in those days, 28 and Phinehas the son of Eleazar, son of Aaron, ministered before it in those days), saying, “Shall we go out once more to battle against our brothers, the people of Benjamin, or shall we cease?” And the Lord said, “Go up, for tomorrow I will give them into your hand.”

29 So Israel set men in ambush around Gibeah. 30 And the people of Israel went up against the people of Benjamin on the third day and set themselves in array against Gibeah, as at other times. 31 And the people of Benjamin went out against the people and were drawn away from the city. And as at other times they began to strike and kill some of the people in the highways, one of which goes up to Bethel and the other to Gibeah, and in the open country, about thirty men of Israel. 32 And the people of Benjamin said, “They are routed before us, as at the first.” But the people of Israel said, “Let us flee and draw them away from the city to the highways.” 33 And all the men of Israel rose up out of their place and set themselves in array at Baal-tamar, and the men of Israel who were in ambush rushed out of their place from Maareh-geba.[a] 34 And there came against Gibeah 10,000 chosen men out of all Israel, and the battle was hard, but the Benjaminites did not know that disaster was close upon them. 35 And the Lord defeated Benjamin before Israel, and the people of Israel destroyed 25,100 men of Benjamin that day. All these were men who drew the sword. 36 So the people of Benjamin saw that they were defeated.

The men of Israel gave ground to Benjamin, because they trusted the men in ambush whom they had set against Gibeah. 37 Then the men in ambush hurried and rushed against Gibeah; the men in ambush moved out and struck all the city with the edge of the sword. 38 Now the appointed signal between the men of Israel and the men in the main ambush was that when they made a great cloud of smoke rise up out of the city 39 the men of Israel should turn in battle. Now Benjamin had begun to strike and kill about thirty men of Israel. They said, “Surely they are defeated before us, as in the first battle.” 40 But when the signal began to rise out of the city in a column of smoke, the Benjaminites looked behind them, and behold, the whole of the city went up in smoke to heaven. 41 Then the men of Israel turned, and the men of Benjamin were dismayed, for they saw that disaster was close upon them.42 Therefore they turned their backs before the men of Israel in the direction of the wilderness, but the battle overtook them. And those who came out of the cities were destroying them in their midst.43 Surrounding the Benjaminites, they pursued them and trod them down from Nohah[b] as far as opposite Gibeah on the east. 44 Eighteen thousand men of Benjamin fell, all of them men of valor. 45 And they turned and fled toward the wilderness to the rock of Rimmon. Five thousand men of them were cut down in the highways. And they were pursued hard to Gidom, and 2,000 men of them were struck down. 46 So all who fell that day of Benjamin were 25,000 men who drew the sword, all of them men of valor. 47 But 600 men turned and fled toward the wilderness to the rock of Rimmon and remained at the rock of Rimmon four months. 48 And the men of Israel turned back against the people of Benjamin and struck them with the edge of the sword, the city, men and beasts and all that they found. And all the towns that they found they set on fire.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. What made the response of the tribes unusual? How did the Levite explain the need for retribution? How did the tribes respond? What strategy did they employ? – (Jdgs.20:1-11) = After generations of fighting against foreign invaders – all the sons of Israel from Dan to Beersheba, including the land of Gilead, came out, and the congregation assembled as one man to the Lord at Mizpah (Jdgs.20:1). This was in response to the lewd and disgraceful acts perpetrated by the men of Gibeah reported by the Levite (Jdgs.20:5-6). Israel refused to return home till this sin had been punished and vowed not to give their daughters in marriage to these Gibeahites (Jdgs.20:8-11; 21:1). They elected to fight with a representative army of ten percent of the soldiers (Jdgs.20:10). The 400,000 soldiers were determined and united.

Q.2. How did the tribe of Benjamin respond to the request from Israel’s army? What was the outcome from the battle? How did Israel respond to the defeat? – (Jdgs.20:12-23) = Before any fighting began Israel sent emissaries throughout the cities of Benjamin to – deliver up the men, the worthless fellows in Gibeah, that we may put them to death and remove this wickedness from Israel (Jdgs.20:13). Benjamin refused and determined to defend Gibeah against Israel (Jdgs.20:13-14). They soon added 26,000 soldiers to 700 choice young men who – … were left-handed; each one could sling a stone at a hair and not miss (Jdgs.20:16). On the first day a huge number of 22,000 men of Israel died (Jdgs.20:19-21). Nevertheless, they had inquired of the Lord and the tribe of Judah was told to lead the way (Jdgs.20:18). This explains the response: (i) They wept before the Lord (Jdgs.20:23). (ii) They encouraged themselves and got ready for a renewed battle (Jdgs.20:22). (iii) Then again – The sons of Israel … inquired of the Lord, saying, “Shall we again draw near for battle against the sons of my brother Benjamin?” And the Lord said, “Go up against him.” (Jdgs.20:23). They certainly didn’t fall apart.

Q.3. How did the second battle end? What makes this surprising? What promise did God make through Phinehas? What made Benjamin complacent? – (Jdgs.20:24-35) = Forty thousand of the Israeli coalition died in battle and 25,100 Benjamites died. But it was for a righteous cause and had Israel have avoided facing up to this diabolical sin the nation would have perished earlier. The second battle ended almost as badly as the first with the loss of 18,000 Israeli soldiers (Jdgs.20:25). It redoubled Israel’s determination to be right with God with tears, prayer, fasting, and sacrifices (Jdgs.20:26). The ark of the covenant was in Bethel and the zealous Phinehas asked for God’s ruling – … And the Lord said, “Go up, for tomorrow I will deliver them into your hand.” (Jdgs.20:28). Israel then set an ambush against the Benjamites and they assumed – … they are struck down before us, as at the firstbut Benjamin did not know that disaster was close at hand (Jdgs.20:32 & 34). It was the beginning of the end as – the Lord struck Benjamin before Israel, so that the sons of Israel destroyed 25,100 men of Benjamin that day, all who draw the sword (Jdgs.20:35). Phinehas is one of the great men of the Bible. He stopped a plague that took 24,000 Israelites because – Phinehas stood and interposed, so the plague was stayed and it was reckoned to him for righteousness to all generations forever (Ps.106:30-31 c.f. Gen.15:6; Num.25:8-13). He also brokered a solution when civil war was threatened between the tribes of Israel in the Promised Land and those east of the Jordan River (Josh.22:13, 30-32).

Q.4. What battle plan did Israel put into place? How was Benjamin defeated? Was the triumph immediate? What was God teaching His people? Is the defeat of evil always costly? – (Jdgs.20:36-48) = The Benjamites were deceived by Israel’s battle plan. They ended up fighting against overwhelming odds on two fronts once the city of Gibeah was set on fire. In all, 25,100 men of Benjamin perished – 18,000 in battles, and some 7,000 that tried to escape in the wilderness (Jdgs.20:42-46). 600 men escaped toward – toward the wilderness to the rock of Rimmon, and they remained at the rock of Rimmon four months (Jdgs.20:47). But Israel wiped out the entire city and set it on fire (Jdgs.20:48). The defeat of evil took time and proved to be costly to the nation. Many families were bereft of their sons and husbands. It cost the perfect Son of God His life to defeat the curse of sin and death and hell. It is better to fight sin than to be overcome by sin!


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Tues 6/11/18

Genesis 39:1-23 … JOSEPH IS A FAITHFUL SERVANT BUT IS MALIGNED AND PUT IN JAIL.

Q.1. Where did the Ishmaelite traders take Joseph? How did he respond to being a slave? How was he treated by his master? Why? – (Gen.39:1-6) =

Q.2. What made Joseph irresistible to Potiphar’s wife? Where was Joseph’s focus in his resistance to temptation? What wrong did Joseph do to land him in jail? – (Gen.39:7-18) =

Q.3. How did his master react to the accusation? Did God abandon Joseph? How badly was Joseph treated in jail? Why? – (Gen.39:19-23) =

Joseph and Potiphar’s Wife

39 Now Joseph had been brought down to Egypt, and Potiphar, an officer of Pharaoh, the captain of the guard, an Egyptian, had bought him from the Ishmaelites who had brought him down there. The Lordwas with Joseph, and he became a successful man, and he was in the house of his Egyptian master. His master saw that the Lord was with him and that the Lord caused all that he did to succeed in his hands.So Joseph found favor in his sight and attended him, and he made him overseer of his house and put him in charge of all that he had. From the time that he made him overseer in his house and over all that he had, the Lord blessed the Egyptian’s house for Joseph’s sake; the blessing of the Lord was on all that he had, in house and field. So he left all that he had in Joseph’s charge, and because of him he had no concern about anything but the food he ate.

Now Joseph was handsome in form and appearance. And after a time his master’s wife cast her eyes on Joseph and said, “Lie with me.” But he refused and said to his master’s wife, “Behold, because of me my master has no concern about anything in the house, and he has put everything that he has in my charge. He is not greater in this house than I am, nor has he kept back anything from me except you, because you are his wife. How then can I do this great wickedness and sin against God?” 10 And as she spoke to Joseph day after day, he would not listen to her, to lie beside her or to be with her.

11 But one day, when he went into the house to do his work and none of the men of the house was there in the house, 12 she caught him by his garment, saying, “Lie with me.” But he left his garment in her hand and fled and got out of the house. 13 And as soon as she saw that he had left his garment in her hand and had fled out of the house, 14 she called to the men of her household and said to them, “See, he has brought among us a Hebrew to laugh at us. He came in to me to lie with me, and I cried out with a loud voice. 15 And as soon as he heard that I lifted up my voice and cried out, he left his garment beside me and fled and got out of the house.” 16 Then she laid up his garment by her until his master came home, 17 and she told him the same story, saying, “The Hebrew servant, whom you have brought among us, came in to me to laugh at me. 18 But as soon as I lifted up my voice and cried, he left his garment beside me and fled out of the house.”

19 As soon as his master heard the words that his wife spoke to him, “This is the way your servant treated me,” his anger was kindled. 20 And Joseph’s master took him and put him into the prison, the place where the king’s prisoners were confined, and he was there in prison. 21 But the Lord was with Joseph and showed him steadfast love and gave him favor in the sight of the keeper of the prison. 22 And the keeper of the prison put Joseph in charge of all the prisoners who were in the prison. Whatever was done there, he was the one who did it. 23 The keeper of the prison paid no attention to anything that was in Joseph’s charge, because the Lord was with him. And whatever he did, the Lord made it succeed.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. Where did the Ishmaelite traders take Joseph? How did he respond to being a slave? How was he treated by his master? Why? – (Gen.39:1-6) = The Ishmaelite traders took Joseph to Egypt and doubtless made a good profit on their purchase. He was bought by Potiphar, the captain of Pharaoh’s personal bodyguard (Gen.39:1 c.f. Gen. 37:28). Grounded by his dreams, Joseph not only accepted slavery but proved himself totally trustworthy and God blessed him and made him successful. God’s approval was not hidden from Potiphar – 3 Now his master saw that the Lord was with him and how the Lord caused all that he did to prosper in his hand. 4 So Joseph found favour in his sight and became his personal servant; and he made him overseer over his house and all that he owned he put in his charge (Gen39:3-4). Potiphar also benefitted greatly and placed all he owned under Joseph’s control (Gen.39:5-6). What could possibly go wrong!?

Q.2. What made Joseph irresistible to Potiphar’s wife? Where was Joseph’s focus in his resistance to temptation? What wrong did Joseph do to land him in jail? – (Gen.39:7-18) = Joseph was a handsome young man in his late twenties and at the prime of his life (Gen.39:6 c.f. Gen.41:46). His elevation in Potiphar’s household made him a target of Satan … and also Potiphar’s wife. Joseph steadfastly refused her advances because of his fear of God – … How then could I do this great evil and sin against God? (Gen.39:9 c.f. Gen.39:7-8). One day she cornered Joseph but he resisted and ran off minus his gown (Gen.39:10-13). She was incensed by the rejection and accused him of making a mockery of her (Gen.39:14-18). But Joseph would rather be falsely accused than let down his master … or God.

Q.3. How did his master react to the accusation? Did God abandon Joseph? How badly was Joseph treated in jail? Why? – (Gen.39:19-23) = Potiphar reacted angrily and had him placed into the jail where the king’s prisoners were incarcerated (Gen39:19-20). He had it in his power to have Joseph executed but perhaps had some doubts about the reports. Joseph posed no threat and – the Lord was with Joseph and extended kindness to him, and gave him favour in the sight of the chief jailer (Gen.39:21). Far from losing control God was equipping a leader – 22 The chief jailer committed to Joseph’s charge all the prisoners who were in the jail; so that whatever was done there, he was responsible for it. 23 The chief jailer did not supervise anything under Joseph’s charge because the Lord was with him; and whatever he did, the Lord made to prosper (Gen.39:22-23). God will never forsake the righteous (Psalm 37:23-25).


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

Mon 5/11/18

Matthew 21:1-17 … THE TRIUMPHAL ENTRY OF JESUS INTO JERUSALEM WHERE HE CLEARS OUT THE TEMPLE.

Q.1. What did Jesus ask His disciples to do at Bethphage? How does the scripture explain His action? What was unusual about His entry into Jerusalem? – (Mt.21:1-5) =

Q.2. What did He do with the donkey? How did the crowds respond? What was the reason for their reaction? What was their conclusion? – (Mt.21:6-11) =

Q.3. What did Jesus do in Jerusalem? How did He explain His extreme behaviour? Why did God give the temple? What did Jesus claim about Himself? – (Mt.21:12-13) =

Q.4. How did Jesus treat the crowds? Why did the chief priests and Pharisees react to the crowds? Why? How did Jesus defend the children? Where did He retreat? – (Mt.21:14-17) =

The Triumphal Entry

21 Now when they drew near to Jerusalem and came to Bethphage, to the Mount of Olives, then Jesus sent two disciples, saying to them, “Go into the village in front of you, and immediately you will find a donkey tied, and a colt with her. Untie them and bring them to me. If anyone says anything to you, you shall say, ‘The Lord needs them,’ and he will send them at once.” This took place to fulfill what was spoken by the prophet, saying,

“Say to the daughter of Zion,
‘Behold, your king is coming to you,
    humble, and mounted on a donkey,
    on a colt,[a] the foal of a beast of burden.’”

The disciples went and did as Jesus had directed them. They brought the donkey and the colt and put on them their cloaks, and he sat on them. Most of the crowd spread their cloaks on the road, and others cut branches from the trees and spread them on the road. And the crowds that went before him and that followed him were shouting, “Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!” 10 And when he entered Jerusalem, the whole city was stirred up, saying, “Who is this?” 11 And the crowds said, “This is the prophet Jesus, from Nazareth of Galilee.”

Jesus Cleanses the Temple

12 And Jesus entered the temple[b] and drove out all who sold and bought in the temple, and he overturned the tables of the money-changers and the seats of those who sold pigeons. 13 He said to them, “It is written, ‘My house shall be called a house of prayer,’ but you make it a den of robbers.”

14 And the blind and the lame came to him in the temple, and he healed them. 15 But when the chief priests and the scribes saw the wonderful things that he did, and the children crying out in the temple, “Hosanna to the Son of David!” they were indignant, 16 and they said to him, “Do you hear what these are saying?” And Jesus said to them, “Yes; have you never read,

“‘Out of the mouth of infants and nursing babies
    you have prepared praise’?”

17 And leaving them, he went out of the city to Bethany and lodged there.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. What did Jesus ask His disciples to do at Bethphage? How does the scripture explain His action? What was unusual about His entry into Jerusalem? – (Mt.21:1-5) = Bethphage was situated in the Mount of Olives adjacent to Jerusalem. Before going down into Jerusalem Jesus called two unnamed disciples to fetch a donkey and her colt (Mt.21:1-2). Mark and Luke only mention the colt – on which no one has ever sat (Mk.11:2; Lk.19:30). Matthew explains – 4 This took place to fulfill what was spoken through the prophet: 5 Say to the daughter of Zion, `Behold your King is coming to you, gentle, and mounted on a donkey, even on a colt, the foal of a beast of burden’ (Mt.21:4-5 c.f. Zech.9:9). So Jesus exactly fulfilled this prophecy by the prophet Zechariah. It was amazing because the colt was not broken in and Christ’s entry was not on a warhorse but a lowly beast of burden.

Q.2. What did He do with the donkey? How did the crowds respond? What was the reason for their reaction? What was their conclusion? – (Mt.21:6-11) = After clothes were placed on the unbroken colt Jesus then rode into Jerusalem amid great celebration (Mt.21:7-8). The crowds were ecstatic and shouted – … Hosanna to the Son of David; Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord; Hosanna in the highest! (Mt.21:9). They were inviting God to save them through the Messiah the promised  Son of David and acknowledged that Jesus by His action was claiming to be the Coming One. Their excitement spread to the city of Jerusalem as the people declared – … This is the prophet Jesus, from Nazareth in Galilee (Mt.21:11).

Q.3. What did Jesus do in Jerusalem? How did He explain His extreme behaviour? Why did God give the temple? What did Jesus claim about Himself? – (Mt.21:12-14) = Upon arriving in Jerusalem – Jesus entered the temple and drove out all those who were buying and selling in the temple, and overturned the tables of the money changers and the seats of those who were selling doves (Mt.21:12). The zeal of Jesus was so formidable that He forbad anyone to even enter the temple with their merchandise (c.f. Mk.11:16; Jn.2:17). It grieved Him that they abused the temple. He reminded them the reason God gave the temple to Israel and the nations – It is written, `My house shall be called a house of prayer’; but you are making it a robbers’ den (Mt.21:13 c.f. Mk.11:17). In quoting this scripture He was claiming that the temple was His home and by blessing the crowds He was using the temple as God intended.

Q.4. How did Jesus treat the crowds? Why did the chief priests and Pharisees react to the crowds? Why? How did Jesus defend the children? Where did He retreat? – (Mt.21:14-17) = But how differently Jesus treated the crowds as – the blind and the lame came to Him in the temple, and He healed them (Mt.21:14). For once there was great excitement in the temple precinct. But the chief priests and scribes were outraged and they spoke accusingly to Jesus – Do You hear what these children are saying? (Mt.21:16). He answered them with the scriptures – Yes; have you never read, `Out of the mouth of infants and nursing babies You have prepared praise for Yourself’? (Mt.21:16). Luke adds that Jesus replied – I tell you, if these become silent, the stones will cry out (Lk.19:40). During the day He taught in the temple and at night He and His disciples stayed at Bethany (Mt.21:17 c.f. Lk.19:37-38, 47-48).


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@oakdenbaptist.org.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009