Tues 12/2/19

Genesis 50:15-26 … JOSEPH THE SHEPHERD & PROPHET.

Q.1. Was father Jacob the originator of the brothers’ request for forgiveness? How does the narrative dispel the idea that Joseph might be carrying a grudge against his brothers’? – (Gen.50:15-17) =

Q.2. What did Joseph think of their offer to be his servants? How did he cope with all his mistreatments? What was his promise to them and their families? How much was Joseph like Jesus? – (Gen.50:18-21 c.f. Heb.12:1-2) =

Q.3. Did Joseph always end up with a ‘raw deal’? In what way was he a prophet? What solemn charge did he give to the descendants of Jacob? How was he an inheritor of the spiritual blessings of the patriarch? – (Gen.50:22-26 c.f. Ex.13:19; Heb.11:22) =

God’s Good Purposes

15 When Joseph’s brothers saw that their father was dead, they said, “It may be that Joseph will hate us and pay us back for all the evil that we did to him.” 16 So they sent a message to Joseph, saying, “Your father gave this command before he died: 17 ‘Say to Joseph, “Please forgive the transgression of your brothers and their sin, because they did evil to you.”’ And now, please forgive the transgression of the servants of the God of your father.” Joseph wept when they spoke to him. 18 His brothers also came and fell down before him and said, “Behold, we are your servants.” 19 But Joseph said to them, “Do not fear, for am I in the place of God? 20 As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people[a] should be kept alive, as they are today. 21 So do not fear; I will provide for you and your little ones.” Thus he comforted them and spoke kindly to them.

The Death of Joseph

22 So Joseph remained in Egypt, he and his father’s house. Joseph lived 110 years. 23 And Joseph saw Ephraim’s children of the third generation. The children also of Machir the son of Manasseh were counted as Joseph’s own.[b] 24 And Joseph said to his brothers, “I am about to die, but God will visit you and bring you up out of this land to the land that he swore to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob.” 25 Then Joseph made the sons of Israel swear, saying, “God will surely visit you, and you shall carry up my bones from here.” 26 So Joseph died, being 110 years old. They embalmed him, and he was put in a coffin in Egypt.

Suggested Answers:

Q.1. Was father Jacob the originator of the brothers’ request for forgiveness? How does the narrative dispel the idea that Joseph might be carrying a grudge against his brothers’? – (Gen.50:15-17) = The brothers claimed that a request for forgiveness to Joseph was from their father, Jacob. That is unlikely because of their reasoning – When Joseph’s brothers saw that their father was dead, they said, “What if Joseph bears a grudge against us and pays us back in full for all the wrong which we did to him!” (Gen.50:15). That revenge was the furthest thing from Joseph’s mind is shown by his reaction to their story – … Joseph wept when they spoke to him (Gen.50:17). It can be very difficult to forgive ourselves for our own sin and degradation.

Q.2. What did Joseph think of their offer to be his servants? How did he cope with all his mistreatments? What was his promise to them and their families? How much was Joseph like Jesus? – (Gen.50:18-21 c.f. Heb.12:1-2) = When they eventually fronted up, they threw themselves prostrate before him and offered to be his slaves for the rest of their days. So Joseph once more explained his divine perspective on the horrible treachery against him – Do not be afraid, for am I in God’s place? (Gen.50:19). He never allowed his power to run to his head. It was not as though he was unaffected by the terrible events in his past, but he had factored God into all his circumstances – As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good in order to bring about this present result, to preserve many people alive (Gen.50:20). Like his Master Jesus, he spoke with comfort and kindness and promised to provide for them (Gen.50:21).

Q.3. Did Joseph always end up with a ‘raw deal’? In what way was he a prophet? What solemn charge did he give to the descendants of Jacob? How was he an inheritor of the spiritual blessings of the patriarch? – (Gen.50:22-26 c.f. Ex.13:19; Heb.11:22) = Joseph fulfilled God’s purpose for his life and that included decades of shame, rejection, suffering, and humiliation. However, God had other things in mind for Joseph – 22 Now Joseph stayed in Egypt, he and his father’s household, and Joseph lived one hundred and ten years. 23 Joseph saw the third generation of Ephraim’s sons; also the sons of Machir, the son of Manasseh, were born on Joseph’s knees (Gen.50:22-23). Like the patriarchs – Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, Joseph gave prophecies about the future of the tribes of Israel which were fulfilled as he declared them – 24 Joseph said to his brothers, “I am about to die, but God will surely take care of you and bring you up from this land to the land which He promised on oath to Abraham, to Isaac and to Jacob.” 25 Then Joseph made the sons of Israel swear, saying, “God will surely take care of you, and you shall carry my bones up from here.” (Gen.50:24-25 c.f. Ex.13:19; Heb.11:22). Though the blessing of the firstborn passed to Judah, it was Joseph who truly inherited the spiritual blessings of the patriarchs. In Jacob’s eyes it was Joseph who received the double portion of his blessing and he stands out as one of the finest examples of a godly Christ-like man in the whole Bible (Gen.48:5,22). He based his life on the promises of God – God will surely take care of you and bring you up from this land to the land which He promised on oath to Abraham, to Isaac and to Jacob (Gen.50:24). God would regather His people to their real homeland.


(Scripture quotations are from The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Text Edition: 2016. Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers.)

If you have any queries about your readings, check Bible Commentary via sonic light.com  or discuss it with your Real Life Group leader or email paulh@cityreach.com.au

©PaulHoogenraad2009

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